USC Rossier unveils 2017-18 lecture series speakers

October 4, 2017

All visiting lecturers are scholars of color

The USC Rossier School of Education returns its annual research lecture series beginning this November, hosting six scholars who specialize in diversity and equity in education. For the second year in a row, all speakers are scholars of color, bringing expertise on social-emotional learning, socializing and curricular reform, among many others topics.

All lectures take place on the University Park Campus at noon, and will be livestreamed through the USC Rossier Facebook page.

Huriya Jabbar
Huriya Jabbar
University of Texas Austin
Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018

Huriya Jabbar is an assistant professor in the Educational Policy and Planning program in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy. Her research examines the social and political dimensions of market-based reforms and privatization in education, including school choice and decision-making in K-12 and higher education contexts.


Terrance Green
Terrance Green
University of Texas at Austin
Thursday, Feb. 22, 2018

Terrance L. Green is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy. His research focuses on the nexus of urban school reform and socially just community development with a particular focus on school and community leaders. Green’s scholarship also examines issues of geography of educational opportunity for children of color from low-income backgrounds.


Fantasy Lozada
Fantasy Lozada
Virginia Commonwealth University
Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2018

Fantasy Lozada is an assistant professor of developmental psychology whose research takes into consideration how cultural-related beliefs (i.e., beliefs about emotion, race, and discrimination) and race-related experiences (i.e., racial identity, discrimination and socialization) impact social-emotional competence among ethnic minority youth.


DeLeon Gray
DeLeon Gray
NC State University
Wednesday, March 7, 2018

DeLeon Gray is an assistant professor of educational psychology. His research examines how adolescents and emerging adults perceive and interpret their social encounters in achievement contexts, and whether these mental representations account for their achievement beliefs and behaviors. His work includes investigations highlighting the role of social identity processes in achievement contexts, particularly in terms of students’ strivings to “stand out” and “fit in” within their peer circles, as well as understanding students’ judgments about socializers (e.g., teachers, parents and mentors), and students’ interpretations of the messages that these socializers convey about scholastic achievement.


Tressie McMillan Cottom
Tressie McMillan Cottom
Virginia Commonwealth University
Wednesday, April 5, 2018

Tressie McMillan Cottom is an assistant professor of sociology. Her book, Lower Ed: The Troubling Rise of For-Profit Colleges in the New Economy (2017, The New Press) has received national and international acclaim. Cottom publishes widely on issues of inequality, work, higher education and technology. This talk was rescheduled from November.


Kalena Cortes
Kalena Cortes
Texas A&M University
Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Kalena Cortes is an associate professor at the Bush School of Government and Public Service, and is a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA). Her research focuses on policies relating to curriculum reform, diversity in higher education, post-secondary returns to education and educational achievement of immigrant children in the United States.


The 2017-2018 Research/Equity Series is sponsored by the USC Rossier Research Office. Any questions can be addressed to Deb Karpman, Assistant Dean for Research at dkarpman@rossier.usc.edu.

Related Story: