Meet the Students

Lucia Lin

Lucia Lin

  • Current USC Rossier minor(s): Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages, Natural Sciences, and Linguistics
  • Current USC major(s): East Asian Language and Cultures, with an emphasis on Japanese
  • Aspirations: “I am aspiring to become an English as a Foreign Language teacher!”
My name is Lucia Lin. I decided to pick up the TESOL minor after experiencing the effects English has on the global community as a common international language, particularly through my interactions with Japanese students when I studied abroad. The TESOL minor was one of my best decisions at USC. I have greatly enjoyed learning about classroom management from a teacher’s perspective. This experience has changed the way I view my own education and language learning processes, and now, I am aspiring to become an English as a Foreign Language teacher! In my free time I like to play traditional Japanese drums with Kazan Taiko and badminton.

Ava Burnell

Ava Burnell

  • Current USC Rossier minor(s): Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
  • Current USC major(s): Business Administration and Social Sciences
  • Aspirations: “One day I will earn my PhD so that I can contribute to the research on how to help minority students reach their full potential in higher education.”
My name is Ava Burnell. I’m from the small city of El Cerrito, California. I decided to minor in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages because a central component of being an effective educator is differentiation of instruction. In many states even if you are not explicitly teaching an ELD class, some of your students will be learning English. The TESOL minor provides you with the fundamental knowledge you will need to help them succeed. In addition to studying theory, TESOL minor students get to perform classroom observations and teach their own lessons. With the passing of Prop 58, the demand for bilingual teachers is going to increase dramatically. The minor can help you get an edge in the job market as well as in the classroom.

As a bisexual, mixed-race, and bipolar student my relationship with education has been one of social compromise. I want to help find solutions to the problems faced by other students like me. LGBT students, students of color, and students experiencing mental illness deserve to have resplendent college careers and to be valued for the unique perspectives they bring to the student body.

In my free time, you’d probably find me listening to Niykee Heaton or watching a Raiders game.