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Center for Urban Education presents equity strategies on global learning

Center takes part in AACU’s conference “Global Learning in College: Defining, Developing, and Assessing Institutional Roadmaps”

By Emily Ogle

Dr. Lindsey Malcom-Piqueux

Dr. Lindsey Malcom-Piqueux

Though equity remains a critical issue in education, many practitioners are not given the time to reflect on how they can incorporate issues of equity into their practices. The Center for Urban Education sought to provide that time for reflection, offering hands-on sessions and activities at a recent conference hosted by the American Association of Colleges and Universities: “Global Learning in College: Defining, Developing, and Assessing Institutional Roadmaps.”

The conference—which took place October 8–10 in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.—was part of a project funded by USA funds, and participants came in teams from 13 institutions around the country. The event focused on examining how faculty and administrators are defining, developing and assessing global learning to prepare students to explore issues from multiple perspectives and across disciplines—and to apply what they learn to real-world situations. CUE developed content and activities that helped participants make sense of equity, learn how to use data to identify equity gaps and create real and actionable goals.

“The participants discussed how inquiry can be used as a strategy to better understand the ways in which existing institutional practices contribute to these equity gaps.”

—Lindsey Malcom-Piqueux, associate director for research and policy of CUE

“At the conference, practitioner teams examined institutional data to identify educational inequities experienced by African-American, Latino and Native American students on their campuses,” said CUE Associate Director for Research and Policy Lindsey Malcom-Piqueux. “The participants also discussed how inquiry can be used as a strategy to better understand the ways in which existing institutional practices contribute to these equity gaps. This type of uninterrupted time to deeply consider one’s own practice in relation to equity is difficult to come by, given the many demands that faculty, staff and administrators face.”

CUE and AACU will continue to work with the 13 participant institutions over the course of the next few years.

“Our work with these institutions will continue over the next two years, and we look forward to providing ongoing support to them as they develop concrete action plans to create equity for their students,” said Malcom-Piqueux.