Elizabeth Marshall Holcombe
Elizabeth Marshall Holcombe

Elizabeth Marshall Holcombe

Cohort: 2014

USC Provost's PhD Fellowship

Teachers College, Columbia University
M.A. Politics and Education

Vanderbilt University
B.A. Political Science, Spanish

Advisor(s)

Concentration

Higher Education

Research Interest

Teaching, learning, and assessment in higher education; leadership and organizational change in higher education; STEM education for first-generation and underserved college students

Elizabeth Marshall Holcombe

Elizabeth Holcombe graduated from Vanderbilt University with a double major in Political Science and Spanish.  After teaching elementary school in Atlanta with Teach for America, she moved to New York City to pursue a Master's degree in Politics and Education at Teachers College.  Upon completing her Master's degree, Elizabeth began working at Mercy College.  Elizabeth managed several programs at Mercy, including a college access partnership, an academic advising and mentoring program, and a new co- and extra-curricular assessment initiative within the Division of Student Affairs.  Currently, Elizabeth is pursuing her PhD in Urban Education Policy with a focus on Higher Education.

Experience

Professional Experience:

  • Research Assistant, Pullias Center for Higher Education, Rossier School of Education, University of Southern California, 2014 - Present
  • Provost's Fellow in Urban Education Policy, Rossier School of Education, University of Southern California, 2014 - Present
  • Senior Director of Student Success and Assessment Initiatives (Interim), Mercy College, 2014 
  • Senior Director of PACT Program, Mercy College, 2012 - 2014
  • Director of School & Strategic Partnerships, Mercy College, 2011 - 2012
  • 2nd Grade Teacher and Kindergarten Teacher, Cleveland Avenue Elementary School, 2008 - 2010

Selected Publications

  • Holcombe, E., & Kezar, A. (2017).  Mental models and implementing new faculty roles. Innovative Higher Education.  
  • Kezar, A., & Holcombe, E. (2017). Creating a unified community of support for underrepresented students in STEM: Lessons from the CSU STEM Collaboratives project. Los Angeles: Pullias Center for Higher Education. 
  • Kezar, A., & Holcombe, E. (2017).  Shared leadership in higher education: Needed capacity to meet higher education’s challenges. Occasional Paper. Washington, D.C.: American Council on Education.    
  • Holcombe, E., & Kezar, A. (2017, May 10). The whys and hows of shared leadership in higher education. [Blog post on Higher Education Today]. Retrieved from: https://www.higheredtoday.org/2017/05/10/whys-hows-shared-leadership-higher-education/
  • Kezar, A., & Holcombe, E. (2017).  Support for High-Impact Practices: A new tool for administrators. Liberal Education, 103(1).  
  • Kezar, A., Holcombe, E., & Maxey, D. (2016).  An emerging consensus about new faculty roles: Results of a national study of higher education stakeholders.  In A. Kezar & D. Maxey (Eds.), The faculty for the 21st century. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.  
  • Kezar, A. & Holcombe, E. (2015).  Institutional transformation in STEM: Insights from change research and the Keck-PKAL Project. In G.C. Weaver, W.D. Burgess, A.L. Childress, & L. Slakey (Eds.), Transforming institutions: Undergraduate STEM education for the 21st century.  West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Press.     
  • Kezar, A., & Holcombe, E. (2015).  The professoriate reconsidered.  Academe101(6).
  • Kezar, A., Maxey, D., & Holcombe, E. (2015).  The professoriate reconsidered: A study of new faculty models.  Los Angeles: The Delphi Project on the Changing Faculty and Student Success.
  • Kezar, A. & Holcombe, E. (2015).  Departmental cultures and non-tenure-track faculty: A self-assessment tool for departments.  Los Angeles: The Delphi Project on the Changing Faculty and Student Success.

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